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Thursday, July 28, 2016

Want to Read a True Story? | Book Recommendations

Hello! This Monday kicks off our next AYearAThon theme, and we will be reading Non-Fiction/Biographies! I have read quite a few novels from this genre that I really enjoyed, and wanted to share some of my favourites with you today. If you don't know what you want to read next week, check out my recommendations.


Night by Elie Wiesel
     Goodreads: click here

Night is a work by Elie Wiesel about his experience with his father in the Nazi German concentration camps at Auschwitz and Buchenwald in 1944-1945, at the height of the Holocaust and toward the end of the second World War. In just over 100 pages of sparse and fragmented narrative, Wiesel writes about the death of God and his own increasing disgust with humanity, reflected in the inversion of the father-child relationship as his father declines to a helpless state and Wiesel becomes his recently teenage caregiver. 




Seriously... I'm Kidding by Ellen DeGeneres
     Goodreads: click here

Seriously…I’m Kidding is a look at Ellen’s life through her humour. In her own words, Ellen says, “I’ve experienced a whole lot the last few years and I have a lot to share…I think you’ll find I’ve left no stone unturned, no door unopened, no window unbroken, no run unvacuumed, no ivories untickled.” 






Hidden Girl by Shyima Hall
     Goodreads: click here
     My review: click here

Shyima Hall was born in Egypt on September 20, 1989, the seventh child of desperately poor parents. When she was eight, her parents sold her into slavery. Shyima then moved two hours away to Egypt’s capitol city of Cairo to live with a wealthy family and serve them eighteen hours a day, seven days a week. When she was ten, her captors moved to Orange County, California, and smuggled Shyima with them. Two years later, an anonymous call from a neighbour brought about the end of Shyima’s servitude - but her journey to true freedom was far from over.



Grace's Guide: The Art of Pretending to Be a Grown-up by Grace Helbig
     Goodreads: click here


Face it - being a young adult in the digital era is one of the hardest things to be. Well, maybe there are harder things in life…but being an adult is difficult! So Grace Helbig has written a guide that’s perfect for anyone who is faced with the daunting task of becoming an adult.


Infused with her trademark saucy, sweet, and funny voice, Grace’s Guide is a tongue-in-cheek handbook for millennials, encompassing everything a young or new (regular or old) adult needs to know, from surviving a breakup or recovering from a hangover. Beautifully illustrated and full-colour, Grace’s Guide features interactive elements and exclusive stories from Grace’s own misadventures - like losing her virginity solely because her date took her to a Macaroni Grill - and many other hilarious lessons she learned the hard way.


Damaged by Cathy Glass
     Goodreads: click here

Although Jodie is only eight years old, she is violent, aggressive, and has already been through numerous foster families. Her last hope is Cathy Glass. At the Social Services office, Cathy (an experienced foster carer) is pressured into taking Jodie as a new placement. Jodie’s challenging behaviour has seen off five carers in four months. Despite her reservations, Cathy deciders to accept Jodie to protect her from being placed in an institution. Jodie arrives, and her first act is to soil herself, and then wipe it on her face, grinning wickedly. Jodie meets Cathy’s teenage children, and greets them with a sharp kick to the shins. That night, Cathy finds Jodie covered in blood, having cut her own wrist, and smeared the blood over her face. Cathy promises that she will stand by Jodie no matter what - her love for the abandoned Jodie is unbreakable. 


A Work in Progress by Connor Franta
     Goodreads: click here

In this intimate memoir of life beyond the camera, Connor Franta shares the lessons he has learned on his journey from small-town boy to Internet sensation so far.

Here, Connor offers a look at his Midwestern upbringing as one of four children in the home and one of five in the classroom; his struggles with identity, body image, and sexuality in his teen years; and his decision to finally pursue his creative and artistic passions in his early twenties, setting up his thrilling career as a YouTube personality, philanthropist, entrepreneur, and tastemaker.


Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling
     Goodreads: click here

Mindy Kaling has lived many lives: the obedient child of immigrant professionals, a timid chubster afraid of her own bike, a Ben Affleck-impersonating Off-Broadway performer and playwright, and finally, a comedy writer and actress prone to starting fights with her friends and coworkers with the sentence “Can I just say one last thing about this, and then I swear I’ll shut up about it?”

Perhaps you want to know what Mindy thinks makes a great best friend (someone who will fill your prescription in the middle of the night), or what makes a great guy (one who is aware of all elderly people in any room at any time and acts accordingly), or what is the perfect amount of fame (so famous you can never get convicted of murder in a court of law), or how to maintain a trim figure (you will not find that information in these pages). If so, you’ve come to the right book, mostly!


Rosalie Lightning by Tom Hart
     Goodreads: click here
     My review: click here

Rosalie Lightning is Eisner-nominated cartoonist Tom Hart’s beautiful and touching graphic memoir about the untimely death of his young daughter, Rosalie. His heart-breaking and emotional illustrations strike readers to the core, and take them along his family’s journey through loss. Hart uses the graphic form to articulate his and his wife’s on-going search for meaning in the aftermath of Rosalie’s death, exploring themes of grief, hopelessness, rebirth, and eventually finding hope again.


What are some of your favourite non-fiction novels? Let me know!

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